Dick Morley Joins Memex Automation Board

November 25, 2013   Articles

Memex Automation is a leader in real-time, shop-floor-to-top-floor technology solutions. Its flagship product, Merlin, delivers Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) metrics in real-time, enabling manufacturers to enhance production and increase income and profits from operations.

Considered the father of the PLC, ABS brakes and the computer floppy disk, Morley is also author of about 30 other patents, winner of the Entrepreneur of the Year Award (1990), and namesake of the Richard E. Morley Society of Manufacturing Engineers Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award. He grew up on the streets of New York (Queens) before raising a family with Shirley, to whom he was married for 50 years. An entrepreneur at heart, an accredited machinist and operator of most machine tools, as well as a designer of some CNCs, Morley worked his way through university paying for half of his education working in the shop. Later, his MIT education and hands-on experience as an angel investor and member of the Breakfast Club enabled him to help finance and counsel more than 100 companies in the New England area.

When asked why he joined Memex as a director of the company’s board, Morley said, “It’s about time that the CNC machines join the concept of SCADA, integration and automation in an efficient manner. This team brings the tools, the technology and the understanding to bring every manufacturing asset into the modern world. I like Merlin because it is an ideal asset manager that is a technological leap forward, beyond PLCs, which enables machines to be compatible with IT systems. On a personal note, it sounds like fun — change the world, again!”

When asked about the similarities of Merlin to SCADA systems, he commented, “Deciding how to make the manufacturing process better by knowing more is a key element. Although my physics training states that causality is a weak function, it is not a weak function in the factory. I feel as though the difference in the company is not the hardware and software, but knowing what to build for the market. I think because what they do is offer a packaged toolkit that helps make manufacturers more efficient, with an ROI measured in weeks, it works.”

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